All posts by Ryanne Flynn

Help Emerging Artists

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picture1You and I know creating music is not just about playing the right notes. What I love about making music, and about the Nova experience, is the chemistry within the group. The final product you see is truly made of individual ideas coming together to become one through many discussions, laughter, and passion.

Symphony Nova’s collaborative creativity, and the artistry you experience at our concerts, is truly unique among orchestras and ensembles. We put creative decisions in the hands of talented emerging artists, and give them the skills they need to pursue their creative endeavors at Symphony Nova and beyond.  Read More

Tascha Anderson

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imageMezzo-soprano Tascha Anderson has received praise from audiences on both the east and west coasts. A native of Montana, she is hailed as “emotionally rich” and, “a brassy mezzo with flair.” Ms. Anderson was most recently seen in the world premiere of Evan Mack’s acclaimed American opera Roscoe at the Seagle Music Colony. Other recent roles include Lady in Waiting (Macbeth), Olga in the Boston premiere of Elena Langer’s Four Sisters, Rosina (Il barbiere di Siviglia), Isabella (L’Italiana in Algeri), Mother Goose (The Rake’s Progress), Bianca (The Rape of Lucretia), Mrs. Pasek (The Cunning Little Vixen), and Orlofsky (Die Fledermaus). Read More

Beethoven Serioso Quartet

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img_0101Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 11 in F minor, also known as “Serioso”, was composed in 1810, which is thought to be the “middle period” of his career, between his early and late works. This piece is unique in not only its compactness, but also in the extreme changes in harmonic structure and mood from movement to movement. Beethoven experiments with ideas from both the classical and romantic periods.
Although it is respected now for its experimentation and uniqueness, Beethoven was not so sure it would be so easily accepted in 1810, and he wrote in a letter that it was “…written for a small circle of connoisseurs and is never to be performed in public”. The piece then premiered in 1814, but was not printed until 1816.

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Respighi – Il Tramonto

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img_0099Il Tramonto is considered one of Respighi’s greatest masterpieces, written for mezzo soprano and string quartet/string orchestra in 1914. It is a setting of the poem “The Sunset”, by P.B. Shelley, which is a story of young love cut short by tragedy. Resembling a smaller-scale opera, it is clear that the music was influenced by some of the great opera composers, such as Monteverdi and Puccini, mimicking the recitative and arioso styles that were typical of early opera. Read Shelley’s poem below!

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Haydn Sunrise Quartet

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img_0100Haydn’s String Quartet Op. 76 No. 4 was composed in 1796/1797 as one of six string quartets which were dedicated to the Hungarian Count Joseph Georg von Erdody. Published in 1799, these six quartets were the last set Haydn  composed, and are often considered to be Haydn’s greatest. No. 4, written in four movements, is often called “Sunrise” because of the ascending theme in the beginning. These quartets were distinct in the fact that they did not conform as strictly to sonata form, and there is clear thematic continuity through the pieces. “Sunrise” demonstrates this with its frequent changes in character and mood and constant reference to the main theme, whether it be an explicit reference or a derived melody.

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Weill: Symphony No. 1

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An early work of Kurt Weill’s, the 1st Symphony evokes a wide variety of characters in its short span, from a broad, reverberant opening, to intimate, expressive chamber music between solo instruments. In 1921 Weill composed music for a competition to collaborate with the playwright Johannes R. Becher, then later reworked that music to fit the scale and instrumentation of this symphony. Although the piece unfolds in a single movement (traditional symphonies have four movements), its episodic nature suggests that each section belongs to a particular scene in Becher’s play. The dramatic context of each “scene” of Weill’s piece is unknown, but the audience is invited to imagine what might be happening on stage if it had accompanied a play. Read More

Read About the Featured Poets

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Symphony Nova and a group of local poets led by Nadia Colbern, whose poetry has been widely published in such places as The New Yorker, American Poetry Review, and The Boston Globe Magazine, are collaborating to present three highly-anticipated performances featuring poetry inspired by and read aloud alongside Ravel’s Mother Goose Suite, Mozart’s Serenade K.388, Piazzolla’s Libertango and Ferenc Farkas’ Antique Hungarian Dances each arranged or written for woodwind quintet. Read More

Meet the Choreographers

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Symphony Nova’s collaboration with Tony Williams Ballet on Friday, November 20th at Old South and Saturday, November 21st at Tony Williams Dance Center will feature new pieces by four choreographers accompanied by chamber music. Here is what two of our choreographers have to say about their pieces: Read More

Tony Williams Ballet – About The Music

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Dag Wiren (1905 – 1986) followed a tradition of classical Nordic composers including Jean Sibelius and others. His music has a strong rhythmic pulse throughout, and his works after 1950 became characterized by repetitive phrases that gradually transform, a style that almost seems to have anticipated the minimalist sounds of Philip Glass or John Adams today. Read More

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